Journal of Information & Privacy Law

Eighteen Years Later, It Is Time for USA Patriot Act Section 215 to Expire

By Sara Geoghegan, Editor in Chief on Thursday, November 14th, 2019

Congress enacted the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA Patriot Act) Act of 2001 on October 26, 2001, roughly six weeks after the September 11thterrorist attacks. The USA Patriot Act codified many surveillance practices that had previously been approved only in court decisions, making them more difficult to change after the crisis had passed.

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GDPR, or the latest acronym that aims to protect users’ online data

By Keri Mikuska, Staff Editor on Thursday, April 18th, 2019

In an age where technology and social media pervade everyday life, where the lines between public and private are increasingly blurred, an individual’s right to privacy is more important than ever. The European Union enacted the GDPR for the purpose of protecting the personal data—specifically data collected over the internet as a result of recent technological advances—of subjects within the EU. And it’s not only member countries of the European Union that are subject to GDPR: any entity that offers goods or services to, or otherwise monitors data subjects in the EU is subject to this regulation.

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Los Angeles Lakers Tackle Frivolous Telephone Consumer Privacy Suit with No Litigation Coverage

By Raquel Lee, Production Editor on Wednesday, January 24th, 2018

Companies are increasingly concerned about abuses of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”), a well-intentioned federal statute enacted to protect consumers from unsolicited messages. Under the TCPA, companies are prohibited from using an automated dialer, sending unsolicited SMS messages, and sending unsolicited fax messages to consumers. The TCPA further requires that consumers must be given…

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The Autonomous Automobile

By Patrise A. White on Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

Webster’s Online Dictionary, defines autonomous as “existing or capable of existing independently”; responding, reacting, or developing independently of the whole. As you may or may not know, the human body performs many of its tasks autonomously. For example, the human nervous system or autonomic nervous system, “…regulates the processes in the body that we cannot…

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The Model Voter: Voter Data, Psychological Profiling and Privacy in Political Elections

By Chathan Vemuri on Monday, January 8th, 2018

Political elections remain contentious whether just before, ongoing or even when they have concluded. Effort is put into trying to make sure the campaign is reaching out to voters who will reliably vote for the candidate come election day. Claims are made about irregular vote counts, missing ballots, votes counted more than once, discrimination at…

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The Legality of WikiLeaks: Are they a Patriot?

By Bianca Wright on Monday, December 4th, 2017

As soon as WikiLeaks began releasing confidential documents, the United States administration began to seek ways to not only prevent the release of publication but to also punish those who have provided confidential information. But the thought of WikiLeaks being a patriot seems to have been overlooked. WikiLeaks should be viewed as a patriot. With…

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Cryptocurrency: digital currency or security?

By Quinn P. O’Grady (AKA Peter Bash), Candidacy Editor on Monday, November 27th, 2017

Instead of investing in the stock market, some individuals have turned to investing in digital currencies, otherwise known as cryptocurrency. One of the more well-known cryptocurrencies is Bitcoin. As of 6:40 am on Friday, November 3, 2017, Bitcoin reached $7,454.04 per coin. With the enormous impact that Bitcoin has had on the public, other cryptocurrencies…

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Cryptocurrency: Should it be regulated?

By Matthew J. Roberts (AKA Jared Franklin), Symposium Editor on Monday, November 27th, 2017

One of the major cases regarding the future of Cryptocurrency is the case of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission v. Recoin Foundation, LLC. This case by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) has the SEC alleging that Recoin and its members violated multiple sections of the 1993 Securities Act and the 1934 Securities…

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Carpenter v. United States: The Evolving Relationship Between Advanced Technology & Personal Privacy

By Raquel Lee on Monday, November 20th, 2017

In June 2017, the Supreme Court granted certiorari to Carpenter v. United States, a case that will an answer an essential question for our data-driven society: whether a warrantless search and seizure of historical cellphone records revealing location and movements of a cellphone user is permitted by the Fourth Amendment. As of 2016, 95% of…

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DNA Technology Causes Growing Privacy Concerns

By Patrise A. White on Monday, October 30th, 2017

As technology advances there is a growing need for more knowledge. Scientist and doctors search for new ways to cure many diseases. Moreover, law enforcement agencies look for better ways to ensure the person being prosecuted is in fact the individual who committed the crime. No other scientific breakthrough has advanced both of these goals…

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